Keeping the State Hospital prepared for unexpected challenges

In 2020, while many around her were concerned about the rapid spread of COVID-19 and the impact it would have on their lives, Lynae Hoyne saw something more. She saw the importance of having medical facilities that were prepared to help in any circumstance. That realization led her to the Arizona State Hospital, where today she works to make sure the hospital and its leaders are prepared for any unexpected challenge.

Lynae’s desire to help others drew her to a career in healthcare almost a decade before she came to Arizona in 2017 from the midwest. At Valleywise Health, located next to the Arizona State Hospital, she worked as a clinic safety officer and a hospital emergency response team instructor. During her time there, she was drawn to the emergency preparedness and response role, and looked at ways to further her training and experience in that field. 

She joined the State Hospital in 2020 and is now the Hospital’s Safety Officer. She works with staff across all departments to conduct safety rounds and facility inspections for various life safety, fire code, and environmental compliance issues that could impact the Hospital’s ability to safely operate,  and follows up on any safety concerns when identified. Lynae also collaborates with others to update plans and policies, as well as keep the hospital’s safety and emergency preparedness policies and guides up to date, and instructs hospital leaders in proper emergency management response methods.

Lynae’s education and training is extensive, including a Bachelor’s degree in Healthcare Management, and a Master’s degree from Arizona State University in Emergency Management/Homeland Security. She is a FEMA-certified instructor for the Hospital Emergency Response Team course, earned an Associate Emergency Management certification through the International Associate of Emergency Managers (IAEM), and has completed a number of OSHA and FEMA courses.

Lynae is inspired by the State Hospital’s history of serving Arizonans.

“After moving to Arizona, I saw that this hospital and its staff has a true desire to help those who face obstacles in getting services they desperately need,” Lynae said. “Not only do I feel that my work here is important, and makes a difference, but I also see how much other staff’s contributions have made an impact as well.”

“Being able to work together and collaborate with other departments makes working here so much easier. We all have the same goal, to provide the best care possible to the patients and residents in our care. I am very fortunate to be working at ASH, and look forward to what the future holds for me here.”

ADHS appreciates Lynae and her dedication to the health and wellness of all Arizonans.

 

Recommend0 recommendationsPublished in My Healthy Arizona

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