#SaludTues Tweetchat 1/19: What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month.

Each year, more than 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States.

This cancer is hurting communities of color, with Latinas being at a high risk of being diagnosed.

But cervical cancer is preventable.

Stopping cervical cancer for all communities means education about the causes, prevention, and treatment of HPV and cervical cancer.

Join #SaludTues on Jan. 19, 2021, at 1:00 PM EST to tweet about what we can do to stop cervical cancer.

We’ll open the floor to data, resources and your experiences as we explore:

  • How cervical cancer is caused, screened, and treated
  • What we can do to address the stigma and misinformation around HPV and cervical cancer
  • What resources are available to cervical cancer patients and survivors

Be sure to use the hashtag #SaludTues to follow the conversation on Twitter and share your strategies, stories, and resources that improve access to healthy food retail.

Click here to learn about the Salud America! #SaludTues tweetchats, see upcoming and past tweetchats, and see how you can get involved.

The post #SaludTues Tweetchat 1/19: What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer? appeared first on Salud America.

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