Eleven nurses pregnant in one VA hospital

You find out you’re pregnant. You quickly tell your family and friends, and then decide how to tell your work family. You’re a little hesitant, but decide to just blurt it out: “I’m having a baby!” Almost immediately, there is a sense of relief. You anticipate the reaction of all of those around you, but then you’re shocked and blown away because 10 of your colleagues scream in unison, “Me, too!”

That sounds like a once-in-a-lifetime scenario, right? It happened. This is the reality for 11 registered nurses in the 2 West Inpatient Surgical Unit at the Audie L. Murphy VA.

“On a baby rollercoaster.”

“2 West is on a baby rollercoaster. Talk about bouncing back after COVID,” said Valerie Rodriguez-Yu, associate director for Patient Care Services at South Texas VA.

Six photos of newborn babies

Six of the 11 babies born to nurses at South Texas VA

“I was very happy and excited for all the staff,” 2W Nurse Manager April Hurtado said when she learned that 11 of her nurses were pregnant simultaneously.

“Oh my gosh, it honestly felt so surreal, like being pranked on TV or something. ‘What? You are pregnant too? No way!’ It must be something in the 2W water,” said Nurse Rebekah Escobedo.

“I was excited when I found out about the other pregnancies, especially this being my first baby,” Nurse Gabriela Nuno said. “I was excited to have not just one but multiple friends to go through this pregnancy with and to share our experiences with one another.”

Having a baby is such a joyous time but it can be extremely nerve-racking, especially being pregnant and delivering your baby during a pandemic.

When asked about her experience while being pregnant and working during COVID-19, Escobedo said, “It was a bit challenging given that any patient could have COVID. It was definitely a risk factor, as our immune system is lower during pregnancy. Being extra cautious was key.”  

“Having to wear a mask and shield with morning sickness was the worst. I think it heightened my awareness of illness and I made sure I was doing all I could to stay well and healthy during my pregnancy,” Nuno added.

Six of the 11 expecting nurses have been delivered thus far, with the most recent one in December 2022. The remaining five babies are expected to arrive in March 2023.

South Texas VA congratulates the 2 West Inpatient Surgical Unit nurses for the newest additions to the family.

Related Articles

5 Essential Frameworks for Preventing Violent Child Death

The U.S. has a violent child death problem. Developing strategies to prevent violent child deaths death from firearms and traffic crashes is a demanding task that requires consideration of numerous upstream, interrelated, and tangential issues. To help safety advocates develop strategies to prevent violent child death, we compiled five frameworks to help: Understand and explain …
The post 5 Essential Frameworks for Preventing Violent Child Death appeared first on Salud America.

What Are the Risk and Protective Factors for Violent Child Death?

Gun violence and traffic crashes may seem like unpredictable events. But they are not random. They are systematic. Data reveal trends and patterns in gun violence and traffic crashes that can help us identify risk factors and protective factors. This is especially important for addressing violent child deaths. So what does the data show? Join …
The post What Are the Risk and Protective Factors for Violent Child Death? appeared first on Salud America.

As Social Need Screening Advances, Transportation Remains an Afterthought

Some big changes in 2022 and 2023 have set up the healthcare sector to advance screening for non-medical social needs in 2024 and beyond. This is great news as we work to address social determinants of health (SDoH), improve health outcomes, and reduce health disparities. But one key social need – transportation – isn’t getting …
The post As Social Need Screening Advances, Transportation Remains an Afterthought appeared first on Salud America.

Gabriela Mistral: First Latina to Win the Nobel Prize in Literature

Gabriela Mistral, born as Lucila Godoy Alcayaga in Chile, was the first Latina author to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1945.  Her poems explore deeply cultural issues of spirituality, heartbreak, death, and childhood.   But beyond her verse and prose, Mistral also changed lives in Latin America and beyond through advocacy, education, and …
The post Gabriela Mistral: First Latina to Win the Nobel Prize in Literature appeared first on Salud America.