#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/2: The Chronic Wound of Health Inequity

You might know that health inequities, such as a lack of access to health care, housing, or transportation, prevent Latinos and other people of color from getting a fair opportunity to live their healthiest.

These inequities can cut deeply, and for a long time.

Some experts compare these inequities to a “chronic wound” that doesn’t heal in a timely or expected way, with both little progress and many long-term health consequences.

Let’s use #SaludTues on Feb. 2, 2021, to tweet about how advocates, planners, and other leaders can take action to solve the chronic wound of health inequities!

  • WHERE: Twitter
  • WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “The Chronic Wound of Health Inequities”
  • WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021
  • HOST: Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio (@SaludAmerica)
  • CO-HOST: University of Florida Transportation Institute (@_UFTI), Planning for Health Equity, Advocacy, and Leadership (PHEAL) from the State of Place (@PHEAL2020)
  • SPECIAL GUESTS: Dr. Mehri Mohebbi of the University of Florida Transportation Institute (@Mohebbmi), Dr. Mariela Alfonzo of the State of Place (@CityFoodLover), and Esther Greenhouse (@EstherGreenhous) and Stephanie Firestone (@firekrone) of AARP
  • HASHTAG: #SaludTues

We’ll open the floor to your comments, tips, and stories as we explore:

  • Why are health inequities like chronic wounds?
  • What ways are people engaging communities in addressing health inequities?
  • How can planners and urban designers uplift health equity?

Be sure to use the hashtag #SaludTues to follow the conversation on Twitter and share your tips, stories, and resources to explore health equity!

#SaludTues is a health equity Tweetchat especially focused on the Hispanic/Latino population at 12 p.m. CT/1 p.m. ET every Tuesday hosted by the @SaludAmerica program at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio.

The post #SaludTues Tweetchat 2/2: The Chronic Wound of Health Inequity appeared first on Salud America.

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