Myra Camino: ‘I Never Let Breast Cancer Steal my Joy’

By Myra Camino
Breast Cancer Survivor in San Antonio

I am a 42 year-old mother of two beautiful little boys (6 and 9 years old). I am a wife and have been married for 11 years to the love of my life Richard. I have been a mentor with Big Brothers Big Sisters for over 15 years. I am currently mentoring my third little sister. Because of my work as a mentor I was chosen as the 2018 National Big Sister of the Year for Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.

Myra Camino metastatic breast cancer survivor
Myra Camino

In August of 2016, at the age of 37, I was diagnosed with stage 3 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast cancer.

After 16 rounds of chemo I was re-diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic breast cancer.

The cancer had spread to my spine. I was fortunate enough to have the cyberknife radiation, which took care of the cancer in my spine.

I had a double mastectomy, and several breast reconstructive surgeries. I also had 28 rounds of radiation to my right breast. My body rejected the tissue expanders, which made reconstruction more complicated. After having the latissimus flap and fat grafting, I decided to stop having reconstructive surgery and I am learning to love this new body, scars and all.

I was  fortunate enough to be N.E.D. (no evidence of disease) for two years. I recently had a recurrence to my left and then to my right femur and I am currently on an oral chemo. I am on my third line of treatment, but lucky enough to be N.E.D. once again.

Metastatic breast cancer is treatable but incurable. I will be in treatment for the rest of my life.

Myra Camino metastatic breast cancer green ninja blogWhen I was diagnosed, I started my blog GreenChemoNinjas as a way to share my story and to inspire other women facing the same diagnosis. I share my story to spread awareness of metastatic breast cancer in young women.

For the past 4 years I have been fighting for my life, but I have never let breast cancer steal my joy.

Read more survivor stories and news about breast cancer!

Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of guest blog posts from Breast Friends Forever (BFF) in San Antonio, Texas (64% Latino). BFF is a support group that enables young breast cancer survivors to share stories and experiences, developed by the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio (the team behind Salud America!) and Susan G. Komen San Antonio. Email BFF or Visit BFF on Facebook. The main image above and additional images feature Myra Camino.

The post Myra Camino: ‘I Never Let Breast Cancer Steal my Joy’ appeared first on Salud America.

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